section 25

The National Assembly and National Council of Provinces has mandated the Constitutional Review Committee to:

  1. review section 25 of the Constitution and other sections where necessary, to make it possible for the state to expropriate land in the public interest without compensation;
  2. propose the necessary constitutional amendments where applicable with regards to the kind of future land tenure regime needed.

You are invited to object or support amendments to the constitution by providing comment below. Should you be at a loss for words, read the live input or documents below the form. Feel free to copy and paste into the message area provided.   Closing date is midnight 15 June 2018.

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LIVE FEED OF COMMENTS SENT

Displaying newest 5 comments sent. Click here to see more.

2018-12-10 00:48:42 +02:00
Liziwe
Yes, change the constitution.
Yes x ten
2018-12-07 20:30:24 +02:00
Heather
No, do not change the constitution.
If u change this u will start a war...what happend to peace of living together as one...u r disgrassing the memory of Mandela this not what he wanted...
2018-12-06 08:24:45 +02:00
Clive
No, do not change the constitution.
No change
2018-12-05 21:23:59 +02:00
Suren
No, do not change the constitution.
There is no need to change the constitution. Depriving people of their right to retain the property which they purchased by hard sweat will lead to violence.
2018-12-05 19:04:14 +02:00
Nic
No, do not change the constitution.
Do not be mistaken, there was also corruption in the apartheid regime, but not prevelant and publicly as it is today. There are no consequences to the corruptors, except maybe to resign from their current positions. They then use those millions of Rands to start/buy businesses and live happily ever after.

The losers in all these cases are always the poor... black and white alike. Properties were not given as a handout to everybody and most middle class people battled for 40 years to have a property they can call their own. For most of the poor they still today have to live with their children as they have nowhere to go.
Why is the racial card always played when it suits the governing party? Black and white people alike have built and maitained our country since long time ago. Ask most elder black people and they will tell you they lived better in the apartheid era than what they do today. So this is not a racial issue...... it is the corruption of the elite who steal from the poor to feed their own pockets.
We have sweat blood and tears to buy a place we can call home in our retirement. To expropriate land without compensation is unthinkable! For example, if all our farmers loose their land, where will the food come from?

The government is making this a racial issue to hide corruption. Rather recoup the stolen trillians and provide the poor with a sustainable living!

THE CONSTITUTION IN YOUR LANGUAGE

Click here to view the Constitution in your language and to see Section 25.

expropriation without compensation

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